Buy Liverpool T-Shirts, LFC Kit and Merch now


Click here for Liverpool FC personalised gift shop

Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst 12345678910 LastLast
Results 51 to 60 of 99

Thread: Wilder v Fury II

  1. #51
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    33,272
    Quote Originally Posted by RedNoodle View Post
    'Being an expert' myself I can tell you that whilst bipolar disorder and depression can affect how you 'feel', they do not change your inherent propensity to be violent, a **** or the like. If you're a ****, you'll still be a ****, just one that is very 'happy' at times, very 'sad' at times, or both. You may even be an 'unfeeling' ****, but you'll still be a ****.

    I've never known a good or bad person to 'switch' just because they've had mental health issues. It's like booze, it might amplify a person's 'character', but unless it is very, very severe it won't suddenly flip it from one side of the coin to another. In such cases you can see there's a problem. These kinds of people don't possess the traits to become a sporting champion. I feel far too many people (especially in sport) are using mental health issues as an excuse/crutch and I don't like it one bit.
    You're only an expert on your own bipolar noodle, it's very different for everyone, for example, if a person with bipolar suffers a long period of sustained abuse, this can induce a psychotic episode, which can trigger extreme violence or thoughts of committing violence and worse and make normally very lovely people into a very dangerous psychopath, this can then cause PTSD as a result of the prolonged period of sustained abuse, your sub conscious then develops triggers to recognise the behaviour that caused it as danger as it does for all forms of danger, then if something happens that your sub conscious recognises as a trigger of that particular danger again, it can send you immediately into another psychotic episode in which you're incredibly dangerous, trust me, I know an awful lot about bipolar and it being comorbid with other things. people who have bipolar are also 45% more likely than anyone else to develop PTSD
    "If Everton were playing at the bottom of my garden, i'd close the curtains”

  2. #52
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    33,272
    Quote Originally Posted by reddownunder View Post
    Seeing Wilder getting the shit bashed out of him is very satisfying
    I really don't like the guy, so normally it would have been, but not how it happened
    "If Everton were playing at the bottom of my garden, i'd close the curtains”

  3. #53
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Crime City
    Posts
    27,806
    Quote Originally Posted by Nineteenx View Post
    You're only an expert on your own bipolar noodle, it's very different for everyone, for example, if a person with bipolar suffers a long period of sustained abuse, this can induce a psychotic episode, which can trigger extreme violence or thoughts of committing violence and worse and make normally very lovely people into a very dangerous psychopath, this can then cause PTSD as a result of the prolonged period of sustained abuse, your sub conscious then develops triggers to recognise the behaviour that caused it as danger as it does for all forms of danger, then if something happens that your sub conscious recognises as a trigger of that particular danger again, it can send you immediately into another psychotic episode in which you're incredibly dangerous, trust me, I know an awful lot about bipolar and it being comorbid with other things. people who have bipolar are also 45% more likely than anyone else to develop PTSD
    That's where your wrong. Having discussed problems around mental health with many others I think have a better grasp than most how mental health issues affect people, especially when it comes to how it changes them in regards to not only themselves, but also when it comes to interacting with others. I know exactly how mental health issues can make a person 'feel', but there is a massive difference between 'feeling' something and 'doing' something. As I said about booze, those that have a violent personality will become violent once they've had a few. Someone like myself however will just become even more miserable and opinionated. I won't suddenly start trying to kick the **** out of anyone that annoys me. Why? Because I was never close to being that way beforehand, and the same applies to most of those that I've seen and spoke to who suffer from mental health issues.

    If you want to believe that Tyson Fury is actually a saint and that anything bad he says or does is down to his 'possible' mental health issues, then so be it. I however don't. I think he's a **** and always was and will be irrespective of any issues he 'might' have. He'll trot it out again once he says or does something bad. If people like him and Ronnie O'Sullivan were as bad as they claim, they'd barely be able to get out of bed, never mind anything else, and even if they could, they'd be more focused on getting as much help as possible (e.g. having a sustained period away from sport) rather than pocketing a load of cash.

  4. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    33,272
    Quote Originally Posted by RedNoodle View Post
    That's where your wrong. Having discussed problems around mental health with many others I think have a better grasp than most how mental health issues affect people, especially when it comes to how it changes them in regards to not only themselves, but also when it comes to interacting with others. I know exactly how mental health issues can make a person 'feel', but there is a massive difference between 'feeling' something and 'doing' something. As I said about booze, those that have a violent personality will become violent once they've had a few. Someone like myself however will just become even more miserable and opinionated. I won't suddenly start trying to kick the **** out of anyone that annoys me. Why? Because I was never close to being that way beforehand, and the same applies to most of those that I've seen and spoke to who suffer from mental health issues.

    If you want to believe that Tyson Fury is actually a saint and that anything bad he says or does is down to his 'possible' mental health issues, then so be it. I however don't. I think he's a **** and always was and will be irrespective of any issues he 'might've have. He'll trot it out again once he says or does something bad. If people like him and Ronnie O'Sullivan were as bad as they claim, they'd barely be able to get out of bed, never mind anything else, and even if they could, they'd be more focused on getting as much help as possible (e.g. having a sustained period away from sport) rather than pocketing a load of cash.
    Sorry Noodle, there are people who use it as a media tool, the experiences i'm talking about are very common and have been shared by many people on MD junction's bipolar forum. A PTSD trigger to behave violently isn't a conscious choice, it's a defence mechanism that your sub conscious puts in place for something it has identified as danger, ergo, once it is in place, it is incredibly difficult to treat, fix or remove, because it is not a voluntary action or behaviour, your sub conscious does it for you, you don't have a choice in the matter, the only real treatment for a condition formed in such a way is avoidance of situations that might trigger it

    Edit: I'm not talking about Fury, he uses it as an excuse for bad behaviour, he doesn't have it as a condition with a comorbid PTSD as a trigger
    Last edited by Nineteenx; 23rd February 2020 at 06:44 AM.
    "If Everton were playing at the bottom of my garden, i'd close the curtains”

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Crime City
    Posts
    27,806
    Quote Originally Posted by Nineteenx View Post
    Sorry Noodle, there are people who use it as a media tool, the experiences i'm talking about are very common and have been shared by many people on MD junction's bipolar forum. A PTSD trigger to behave violently isn't a conscious choice, it's a defence mechanism that your sub conscious puts in place for something it has identified as danger, ergo, once it is in place, it is incredibly difficult to treat, fix or remove, because it is not a voluntary action or behaviour, your sub conscious does it for you, you don't have a choice in the matter, the only real treatment for a condition formed in such a way is avoidance of situations that might trigger it

    Edit: I'm not talking about Fury, he uses it as an excuse for bad behaviour, he doesn't have it as a condition with a comorbid PTSD as a trigger
    Having 'inside info' on PTSD I know that it's not a conscious choice. However the unconscious choice/decision is directed by two things a) The nature of the trigger, and b) The nature of the sufferer. The more extreme either of those two things, the more likely the are to engage in extreme behaviour e.g. someone who is put in a threatening situation is more likely to be violent if they already had violent tendencies and/or are put in a potentially (to them) 'violent' situation, than someone who doesn't have violent tendencies being put into a stressful, but not as potentially dangerous situation.

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    33,272
    Quote Originally Posted by RedNoodle View Post
    Having 'inside info' on PTSD I know that it's not a conscious choice. However the unconscious choice/decision is directed by two things a) The nature of the trigger, and b) The nature of the sufferer. The more extreme either of those two things, the more likely the are to engage in extreme behaviour e.g. someone who is put in a threatening situation is more likely to be violent if they already had violent tendencies and/or are put in a potentially (to them) 'violent' situation, than someone who doesn't have violent tendencies being put into a stressful, but not as potentially dangerous situation.
    You forgot (C) Noodle, the nature of how the PTSD was formed, the longevity over which it was formed and the extremity of the psychotic episode that continued abuse triggered, any other life traumas the psychotic episode caused (loss of independence, loss of relationships etc etc)

    A situation doesn't have to be a potentially violent situation for a trigger or to trigger violence, if the psychotic episode triggered involved violent irrational otherwise completely out of character behaviour, but the prolonged abuse wasn't of a violent nature, the trigger isn't going to be violence, it's going to be behaviour the sub conscious recognises as being the same as that which occurred in the prolonged period of abuse.

    So say this was work place abuse over a sustained period of time, in which the person was threatened with violence, systematically robbed, systematically abused for a disability and their life made as uncomfortable by a combination of these things and people being deliberately awkward and difficult with them also, day in, day out of a period of years, until the drip drip drip of it triggered a psychotic episode, then it could easily be triggered by being in a place of work and anybody doing these things or the sub conscious perceiving they were doing these things

    Edit: It could even be triggered by something as simple as being somewhere which had similar or the same lighting and operating systems and environment as the place the prolonged abuse took place
    Last edited by Nineteenx; 23rd February 2020 at 08:26 AM.
    "If Everton were playing at the bottom of my garden, i'd close the curtains”

  7. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    belfast
    Posts
    11,990
    Obviously I know the result but I'm now watching the repeat for the first time.
    First thing I nor iced about the ring walk was the Wilder singer going on about black this and black that.
    A little racist me thinks.

  8. #58
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    belfast
    Posts
    11,990
    Does Wilder skip leg day ?

  9. #59
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    belfast
    Posts
    11,990
    Wilder looks like he's looking for the one punch winner. Nothing else.

  10. #60
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    33,272
    Quote Originally Posted by ianlfc View Post
    Wilder looks like he's looking for the one punch winner. Nothing else.
    I think he modelled himself on Ivan Drago
    "If Everton were playing at the bottom of my garden, i'd close the curtains”

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •