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Thread: Meet William Spearman, Liverpool’s secret weapon

  1. #11
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    Fascinating stuff. The general premise puts me in mind of the driverless car/vehicle.
    Speaking as a "retired" computer programmer, you always have to consider "what if" something comes along that is outside the parameters that have been defined?
    Great if it works and we keep ahead of other parties.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by scientificred View Post
    You should question it always.
    What has religion got to do with it?
    Going off topic.
    I don't recall such data being mentioned in the Bible.
    Personally speaking I would hope we are all viewed as something more than our data statistics.
    12 disciples, one was a turn coat. Jesus predicted it.
    Theres the first example of data analysis right there!

    The guy who made up the bible was well before his time..........

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by scientificred View Post
    I came into football with Bill Shankly as my hero.
    He must be wrestling in his grave.
    What has happened to the game.
    It is not just football but everywhere - data analysts.
    I took a course a few years back with the Open University on data analysis.
    It was quite brilliant but it taught me that you can portray any picture you want with certain graphs.
    The right targetted audience will believe the data.
    Depending on your audience?
    Data analysis is only a branch of mathematics. I quite love some branches of mathematics.
    Time will tell if the trends portrayed come true.
    If more and more influential people believe such data then perhaps it is a self-fulfilling prophecy.
    For myself I fear for the World in the hands of data analysts. They will make the graph match the buyer's wishes.
    Excellent post on many levels.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by scientificred View Post
    It was quite brilliant but it taught me that you can portray any picture you want with certain graphs.
    The right targetted audience will believe the data.
    Even if the audience is pretty mathematically literate and will fire you if the things you present them lead them down a bad path?
    Etiamsi omnes, ego non

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by teesred View Post
    12 disciples, one was a turn coat. Jesus predicted it.
    Theres the first example of data analysis right there!

    The guy who made up the bible was well before his time..........
    That was not data analysis - Jesus knew who that was going to be.

  6. #16
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    I wonder what mr data analysis.. ahem - would tell us about this young fella. 18 years old... haha

    New from MatigolVidz... and all from the single topurnament


  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Balinkay View Post
    Even if the audience is pretty mathematically literate and will fire you if the things you present them lead them down a bad path?
    Leave before you get fired.
    You need to present your data to the target audience.
    Data analysis is a branch of maths of its own and so even if the audience is mathematically literate they could still buy into your presentation. Even if the audience was a bunch of data analysts they might be more impressed with your presentation.
    What I learnt from my studies was that there is quite a big difference between data representation and data presentation.
    Data presentation is probably never wrong.
    Look at what the UK government likes to push forward today.
    UK gov tests more than any other nation.
    As an example there is an old ad that says 9 out of 10 cats prefer a certain cat food. Target the right data sources and clean your data accordingly and you will end up with that result.
    You have to question the whole source of that data.
    It is a bit of a minefield.
    A good data analyst will say 'let me help you'.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steveo View Post
    I wonder what mr data analysis.. ahem - would tell us about this young fella. 18 years old... haha

    New from MatigolVidz... and all from the single topurnament [...]
    Probably that he's pretty amazing. I'd have thought you could see that with the naked eye though.
    Etiamsi omnes, ego non

  9. #19
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    It's a fair point Bali.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by scientificred View Post
    Leave before you get fired.
    You need to present your data to the target audience.
    Data analysis is a branch of maths of its own and so even if the audience is mathematically literate they could still buy into your presentation. Even if the audience was a bunch of data analysts they might be more impressed with your presentation.
    What I learnt from my studies was that there is quite a big difference between data representation and data presentation.
    Data presentation is probably never wrong.
    Look at what the UK government likes to push forward today.
    UK gov tests more than any other nation.
    As an example there is an old ad that says 9 out of 10 cats prefer a certain cat food. Target the right data sources and clean your data accordingly and you will end up with that result.
    You have to question the whole source of that data.
    It is a bit of a minefield.
    A good data analyst will say 'let me help you'.
    There's a huge difference in the use cases though, sc.

    When selling cat food your objective function is to maximise the amount of cat food sold. You're incentivised to massage the data to portray that brand as a really good one. E.g. you give those cats the choice between your cat food and... er... I dunno... something cats don't like. Frozen dog piss maybe? You manipulate the customer into buying one of the options, maximising the value of your objective function.

    What would be your incentive to present one player as better than another? There your objective function is (let's say for the sake of simplicity) derived from the team's performance on the pitch. You recommending the wrong choice to the customer directly makes the team perform worse, thereby lowering the value of the exact objective function you want to maximise. And eventually getting you fired, like it did with Commoli.

    I fully accept your point that presenting data in a certain way can be used to manipulate your audience into believing something that isn't strictly speaking true. But how does that in this particular case make any sense, short of some absurd conspiracy theory that you're an enemy spy?
    Etiamsi omnes, ego non

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